EC Rare Books
WALLIS'S TOUR THROUGH ENGLAND AND WALES, A NEW GEOGRAPHICAL PASTIME Wallis, John

WALLIS'S TOUR THROUGH ENGLAND AND WALES, A NEW GEOGRAPHICAL PASTIME Wallis, John


WALLIS'S TOUR THROUGH ENGLAND AND WALES, A NEW GEOGRAPHICAL PASTIME

Wallis, John

Publication Date: 1802

Published by John Wallis, London (1802) John Wallis, London, 1802. 17.6 x x 19.75 inch folding game board. Linen mounted, engraved by A. McIntyre (Edinburgh). Game rules in letterpress columns, left and right. The game is lettered McINTYRE SCULPSIT LONDON PUBLISHED 24th December 1794 BY JOHN WALLIS AT HIS MAP WAREHOUSE NO. 16 LUDGATE STREET. Slipcase is lettered PUBLISHED MARCH 8th 1802 BY JN WALLIS AT HIS MAP WAREHOUSE LUDGATE STREET.; on the rules in letterpress PRINTED BY J CROWDE WARWICK SQUARE. In order to play this race game through England and Wales, each player must have a marker, usually in the shape of a pyramid, and four counters. An eight-sided teetotum spinner is also needed. There are 117 playing spaces each designating a place, beginning with Rochester and ending in London. These places and their descriptions are listed at the sides of the playing surface with many rewards or penalties for landing on them. The worst place to land is the Isle of Man, where the traveller is shipwrecked and has to leave the game. The descriptions of the towns, while still creating the illusion of a visit to an interesting place, highlight the idea of commerce and trade. Many manufacturing towns are mentioned, including Worcester for its china and gloves, Manchester and Leeds for their cloths, and Berwick for its salmon fisheries. *Like A NEW ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL PASTIME (E.5307-1960), the towns and descriptions are shown together with many rewards or penalties; in this case there are only 117 compartments. Although the basic playing method is the same, there is one major difference, which is the kitty. To start, each player has a marker, called a traveler, and four counters, which are kept. Most of the forfeits involve missing turns, but two ask for payment. The Isle of Man is the harshest; there, the traveler is shipwrecked and has to leave the game. The descriptions of the towns, while still creating the illusion of a visit to an interesting place, highlight the idea of commerce and trade. This game continued for many years and the rules booklet for this example was printed in 1802.


970 USD