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Italy, a Poem. London. 1830 Published by T. Cadell; E. Moxon, London, 1830.  Rogers, Samuel; Turner, William ( Illustrator )

Italy, a Poem. London. 1830 Published by T. Cadell; E. Moxon, London, 1830. Rogers, Samuel; Turner, William ( Illustrator )


First Edition

VII, 284 p.; full contemporary leather binding with gilt tooling to covers and spine, gilt edges, gilt spine.  some moderate spotting and offsetting as often; most attractively bound in contemporary brown hard grain Morocco, Illustrated with numerous fine steel engraved vignettes. by Turner, Stothard and others. "Turner's work as an illustrator in the stricter signification is important, and some of the most exquisite work of engravers is seen in his vignettes to Rogers' 'Italy' (1830) and Poems (1834)". (Hind). Some engravings on Venice (several), Florence, Cf. Hind, A. M. Short History of Engraving and Etching p. 222-23. Bland 'History of Book Illustration'. Italy and the Italian Renaissance inspired these poems and drawings. In the extensive Notes, on manners, customs and local superstitions. Expert repair to front joint. A very good copy.

Fore Edge Painting     St. Mark’s Basilica

It is a famous church of Venice and an example of beautiful Byzantine architecture. There are ceilings adorned with mosaics, statues made of bronze and columns made of gorgeous marbles. It is a must-see attraction in Venice.

The Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mark (officially known in Italian as the Basilica Cattedrale Patriarcale di San Marco and commonly known as Saint Mark's Basilica) is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice, northern Italy. It is the most famous of the city's churches and one of the best known examples of Italo-Byzantine architecture. It lies at the eastern end of the Piazza San Marco, adjacent and connected to the Doge's Palace. Originally it was the chapel of the Doge, and has only been the city's cathedral since 1807, when it became the seat of the Patriarch of Venice,[2] archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice, formerly at San Pietro di Castello.

For its opulent design, gold ground mosaics, and its status as a symbol of Venetian wealth and power, from the 11th century on the building has been known by the nickname Chiesa d'Oro (Church of gold).


750 USD
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